Reclaiming Our Way promoting the well-being of African American children & families

22Jun/150

NewsOne Now Charleston Church Massacre Special Report Audio Podcast

Emanuel AME Church mass shooter Dylann Roof confessed to killing 9 people and told investigators he wanted to start a “race war.” Roland Martin and NewsOne Now bring you the latest details in the hate crime investigation and the latest details on the ground in Charleston, SC.

Why Are We Seeing An Increase In Hate In America? & The Rise In Acts Of Domestic Terrorism By “Lone Wolfs”

Lecia Brooks, Outreach Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center, joined Roland Martin on NewsOne Now to discuss why we are seeing an increase in hate crimes against minorities in America.

How Do We Confront Hate In America?

Roland Martin talked with Bishop Vashti McKenzie and Dr. Greg Carr about how we should confront hate in America in the wake of the Emanuel AME Church massacre.

Is America Ready To Have A Discussion About Race?

Roland Martin and the NewsOne Now panel, featuring Communications Specialist Jeff Johnson, Attorney Monique Pressley, Georgetown University Law Professor Paul Butler, and Managing Editor of Politic365.com Lauren Victoria Burke, discuss if America is ready to have a serious conversation about race in the aftermath of the Emanuel AME Church mass shooting.

From Friday, June 19, 2015...
TV One Now - CharlestonChurchMasacre

22Jun/150

Charleston AME Church Massacre: Additional Perspectives on Terror and White Supremacy

From today's edition of Democracy Now...

Segment 1:  Dylann Roof’s White Supremacist Views, Links to Hate Group Revealed After Charleston Church Massacre

Church bells tolled Sunday and hundreds filled the church’s pews of the historic Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, for the first service since Dylann Roof’s attack on a Bible session in its basement last Wednesday. An estimated 20,000 people formed a Bridge to Peace unity chain on the Ravenel Bridge to show solidarity with his victims. A website discovered Saturday called "The Last Rhodesian" shows photographs of Roof at Confederate heritage sites and hosts a 2,500-word manifesto he is believed to have written that explains why he chose to carry out his mass murder spree. "Roof might have been a high school dropout, but he was an excellent student, it seems, of the white supremacist world," says Richard Cohen, president of the Southern Poverty Law Center. He is co-author of an editorial published today in The New York Times titled "White Supremacists Without Borders."

 

Segment 2:  "That Flag Represents White Supremacy": Confederate Flag Still Flies at South Carolina State Capitol

Wednesday’s massacre of nine African-American churchgoers by white supremacist suspect Dylann Roof have reignited protests over the Confederate flag, which still flies on the grounds of South Carolina’s Capitol. In photos posted online, Roof is seen posing with the flag and in front of a car with a front license plate that reads, "Confederate States of America." "People’s tax dollars ought not go into supporting the idea of the Confederate States of America," says Kevin Alexander Gray, a South Carolina civil rights activist and community organizer who edited the book "Killing Trayvons: An Anthology of American Violence." As former president of the state ACLU, he argued, "the flag flying on the statehouse dome was compelled speech. You were compelling people to support an ideology of white supremacy."

 

Segment 3:  "A Classic Case of Terrorism": Is FBI Ignoring White Violence by Refusing to Call Roof a Terrorist?

 Civil rights activist Kevin Alexander Gray and Richard Cohen, president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, discuss whether the shooting in Charleston was an act of domestic terrorism. "Dylann Roof was a human drone, and every Tuesday morning the Obama administration uses drones to kill people whose names we don’t even know and can’t pronounce," Kevin Alexander Gray says. "So I don’t know if I feel comfortable with the idea of expanding this word 'terror.'" But Richard Cohen calls the shooting "a classic case of terrorism." "It’s politically motivated violence by a non-state actor and carried out with the intention of intimidating more persons than those who were the immediate victims," Cohen says. "I think in some ways it’s important to talk about terrorism in that way, not so we can send out drones, not so we can deny people their due process rights, but so we can understand the true dimensions of what we’re facing."